Benefits of the WhereSafe GPS System for Trailers

Benefits of the WhereSafe GPS System for Trailers

Anywhere there are aluminum trailers for sale, there is a risk that they will be stolen. Aluminum trailers are in especially high demand among thieves because of their high resale value and durability. When you install a WhereSafe GPS for your trailer, you can be assured that, in the unhappy event that someone steals your trailer, you’ll be able to track its location and recover it quickly. 

What Can the WhereSafe GPS System Do for Me?

One reliable way to prevent theft is to install a WhereSafe GPS system. Hard-wired GPS trackers attach to your trailer with a magnet. They are easy to install, requiring only power, ground, and ignition. OBDII trackers are installed inside the cab of your vehicle. Simply insert them into the OBDII port, usually located underneath the steering column. Another GPS option is a fully battery-powered option for more flexibility. 

Receive Alerts to an App on Your Phone 

This takes away the need for you to manually check on the status of your trailer. Any time the trailer moves after-hours, or if it leaves your geographical zone, you will get an alert in the app and an email. 

Create a Geofence Boundary Around Your City 

You can use the WhereSafe app to draw an invisible geographical line around the perimeter of your service area. If your trailer crosses that line, you’ll be notified immediately. 

Know When Your Device Has Been Tampered With

You’ll also receive an alert anytime the device has been disabled, or if the battery dies. This is often the first sign that your trailer has been stolen. 

Why Are People Stealing Aluminum Trailers? 

The cost of living is going up in Ontario, and people are becoming desperate. The CBC has reported that since this time last year, carjackings are already on pace to exceed last year’s numbers. Some folks are looking for any way to make money by selling someone else’s assets. Car thefts, especially, are on the rise.

In some cases, trailers are easier to steal than cars and trucks. If there is no hitch lock and you are parked in a remote area, it may be just the right conditions for your trailer to be stolen. In March, Waterloo regional police reported that 17 trailers had been stolen. Thieves are especially interested in stealing covered trailers that may contain other valuable assets such as heavy equipment, snowmobiles, tools, and ATVs. 

What Can I Do To Prevent Theft? 

Several common-sense strategies may help your trailer from being stolen. Thieves want to quickly get in and out undetected, so anything that slows or frustrates their process may encourage them to look elsewhere. Theft prevention strategies include: 

  • Set up Video Surveillance
  • Install Motion-activated Flood Lights 
  • Use Hitch Locks and Tongue Locks
  • Park in Crowded Areas
  • Add an Alarm System
  • Hide GPS Devices 

High-quality Aluminum Trailers for Sale by McFarlane

Once you have considered how to keep your aluminum trailer safe, peruse our website for a variety of aluminum trailers and trailer parts. We have a large selection that covers everything you need for hauling, household, and business needs. Consider popular models such as:

Aluminum trailers are lighter than traditional steel, increasing your payload capacity and your fuel efficiency. They are also resistant to weather corrosion and rust, reducing the cost of repair and increasing their longevity. Many aluminum trailers outlive the towing vehicle they’re attached to.

Contact us today by phone or use this page of our website. Our #1 goal is your satisfaction. 

Tips to Pack and Use a Utility Trailer for Camping

Tips to Pack and Use a Utility Trailer for Camping

How To Use a Utility Trailer for Camping

Utility trailers are useful for performing many different jobs, but they are not only for work. If you have difficulty packing all the gear you need when you go on a camping trip, a utility trailer may be able to help. Here is a guide to looking for used trailers for sale for camping use.

Why Should You Use a Utility Trailer for Camping?

Part of the fun and the challenge of camping is that you have to bring along everything you need with you for the duration of your stay. That can add up to a lot of stuff, especially if you are camping in a tent rather than a camper because you do not have built-in storage. You may have to load up all your gear in the car. This can make driving more dangerous because your rear vision may be impeded. It can also pose a challenge if you are camping with a large family. A trailer is a dedicated storage vehicle that can store all your gear, freeing up room inside the vehicle.

Even if you are camping in an RV, you may still want to bring a trailer with you on your trip. This allows you to haul toys such as ATVs that you plan to use for recreation while camping.

How Do You Pack a Utility Trailer for Camping?

When packing a utility trailer for any reason, you always have to be mindful of its weight capacity and be careful not to load more than it can carry. A trailer with a hauling capacity of at least 5,000 pounds should be sufficient for hauling the gear that you need for a camping trip of a few days. Nevertheless, even when the load is well under the hauling capacity, it is still important to load the trailer correctly to prevent damage to both the cargo and the trailer itself.

You may not need to be told that you need to load the front of the trailer first, but what you may not know is that you need to load the heaviest items first. The heavier items have to go in the front to prevent the trailer from swaying. If the trailer only has one axle, the heaviest items should go ahead of it. The cargo should be tied down securely, and the weight of the load should be evenly distributed from side to side.

Items that are top-heavy could fall over when you stop or go around corners. This could damage them as well as other items. These are the first items you should pack, and then you should tie them down from several different angles.

What Type of Utility Trailer Is Best for Camping?

There’s a strong case to be made in favour of an enclosed utility trailer for camping. If you have a locking door on the trailer, you can keep any valuables that you bring with you safe during the trip and prevent wild animals from getting into your food. An enclosed trailer can keep your gear dry in case of rain and serve as a makeshift camper or impromptu rain shelter if you need it to.

If you plan to haul toys with you on your camping trip, it would probably be ideal to have an enclosed trailer for them to protect them from the weather. On the other hand, an enclosed trailer may not be large enough to hold them. Therefore, you may do better with a flatbed or equipment trailer that you can cover with a tarp as needed.

Find Used Trailers for Sale From McFarlane Trailer Sales and Service

We carry a wide range of high-quality trailers from top manufacturers. Check out our selection.

How to Avoid Trailer Sway

5 Tips To Avoid Trailer Sway

5 Tips To Avoid Trailer Sway

A single-axle utility trailer offers you many advantages as far as hauling cargo goes. However, it could also pose a risk of a dangerous situation called trailer sway. This occurs when a trailer fishtails from side to side while still attached to the towing vehicle. The cause is forces on the side of the trailer. Though this often occurs due to wind, including the bow wind that occurs when passing a semi-truck, other factors can cause or contribute to it.

The danger of sway is that the trailer could tip over and bring your vehicle with it. You can’t control all the factors that can cause trailer sway, but you can take steps to prevent it and learn how to cope with it should it occur.

1. Learn How To Cope With Windy Conditions

Ideally, you would avoid towing your trailer at all when conditions are windy, but it may not always be possible to avoid it. Here are some driving tips to avoid sway when towing a trailer and to manage the problem if it does occur:

  • High speeds make sway even worse, so do not speed up when you notice it occurring.
  • Reduce speed but do it gradually. Only apply the trailer brakes, and do not slam on them.
  • Don’t try to steer out of sway. Instead, keep the steering wheel steady.

As soon as you are able, pull over to see if you can figure out what is causing the trailer to sway and how you might be able to correct it. If you ignore it, the problem is likely to persist, which can put you in danger.

2. Check Your Tires

If your tires are uneven in their size or air pressure, they could put your trailer off balance. Even if this does not cause a sway directly, it could put you at greater risk for one. This includes the tires of both the trailer and the towing vehicle. Before you set out, check that all the tires are the same size as well as being inflated to the correct tire pressure.

3. Make Sure the Weight Is Within the Load Capacity

There is a load capacity for your trailer and a load capacity for your vehicle. The capacities of each include the weights of the vehicles as well as the cargo. Factor in the weight of the tongue, which is the part that connects the trailer to the towing vehicle. The weight of the vehicle occupants also has to be taken into consideration.

4. Load the Vehicle Correctly

It is not enough to make sure the weight is within the load capacity; it also has to be loaded correctly in the vehicle to avoid sway. The heaviest items should be at the front of the trailer. This puts 10% to 12% of the weight over the tongue of the vehicle, which is necessary to prevent sway.

If items in the trailer are allowed to shift from side to side, it could throw off the equilibrium and cause the trailer to sway. Therefore, the cargo should be tied down. It may take some practice at redistributing the load to get the weight distributed properly. Ultimately, if you can’t distribute the weight adequately, you may have to remove some of the items, either coming back for them later or making other arrangements to transport them.

5. Consider a Friction Sway Control Device

For smaller trailers, one of these devices should be adequate, but you need one on either side of the hitch if the trailer is over 5,000. By applying resistance to the trailer, these devices help reduce the effects of sudden and unpredictable wind gusts.

A single-axle utility trailer is only one type of trailer we offer. Check out our selection of quality manufacturers.

Equipment Trailer Service and Repair Checklist for Summer

Trailer Service and Repair

Perhaps you just bought a new equipment trailer and you’re looking forward to getting on the road during the summer season with your new model — or maybe you’re noticing some odd noises, worn tires, or cracked spots in the vehicle you’ve had for a few years. Summer is the ideal time to address many trailer maintenance issues regardless of whether you’re experiencing problems or not. Learn more about summer trailer service and repair and decide which maintenance jobs to book now.

Why Summer Is a Great Trailer Maintenance Season

Summer is a season of extremes: Days can be blisteringly hot while nights are often much cooler. This added pressure of changing temperatures means that your trailer’s parts are expanding and contracting. You may also have to deal with rain that can cause water damage and direct sunshine that can heat your unit to a dangerous temperature.

It’s a good idea to perform maintenance and any necessary repairs before summer starts, but scheduling these appointments during the hottest months of the year is fine, too. Make the most out of summer by ensuring the safety of your cargo trailer before more difficult and dangerous winter weather sets in.

5 Common Summer Trailer Repairs

Don’t get caught with a costly repair on your hands because you forgot to complete your summer maintenance checklist! Go over the following list and feel free to add more of your own items as they pertain to your trailer. 

1. Tires

Like many people, you likely drive a lot during the summer. This means that you should check your tires to make sure they’re fully inflated and have no leaks. Check them with an air pressure gauge before you head out on the road and replace old models if necessary.

2. Doors and Windows

Regardless of the type of cargo your trailer is transporting, it’s important to keep it dry. Make sure all doors, windows, and openings are properly sealed. If your trailer is especially old, you may need to replace hinges, gaskets, or handles to ensure that you can fully open and close the doors.

3. Brakes

It’s a good idea to check the brakes on any vehicle before you use it. Trailer brakes, like any other vehicle’s brakes, aren’t immune to wear and tear, and they need to be replaced at least once a year for safety reasons. Signs of brake problems may include unusual noises coming from your trailer in addition to strange sensations as you’re stopping.

4. Floors

Wood is porous and rainwater can easily soak through it. If your trailer has a plywood floor, a dry day in the summer is a great time to re-coat the underside of it. The undercoating, or the application of waterproof sealant that’s applied to the underside of the floor, is what protects your floor from water damage, rot, and mould issues.

5. Roof

Your roof bears the brunt of the season’s weather. Hot days and rainstorms can wreak havoc on a roof that has not been properly sealed. Invest in a high-quality roof sealant to keep your cargo safe in whatever kind of weather you encounter this summer.

Contact Us To Schedule Your Trailer Service and Repair Appointment

It’s important to address small maintenance problems before they become bigger ones. Create a checklist for each season to stay on top of your vehicle’s needs.

At McFarlane Trailer Sales, we offer a wide variety of custom-built, new, and used trailers as well as replacement parts and high-quality, reliable service appointments. Get in touch with us to learn more and schedule your trailer’s summer service today!

The Importance of Servicing Your Enclosed Utility Trailer

The Importance of Servicing Your Enclosed Utility Trailer

The trailer is one of the most important parts of any towing setup. Nevertheless, you may take it for granted, not giving much thought to its maintenance because it doesn’t use oil as your towing vehicle does. Still, enclosed utility trailers do have moving parts, which means that they need regular maintenance if they are going to stay in good shape. Here are some answers to questions you may have about maintaining your trailer.

How Important Is It To Maintain Your Trailer?

Regular maintenance on your trailer helps it meet or exceed its expected useful lifespan. This means that your money goes further following your purchase. Maintaining your trailer regularly also helps you to avoid unpleasant surprises that result from your trailer breaking down on the road in the middle of towing something large and cumbersome.

How Often Should You Service Your Enclosed Utility Trailer?

Generally speaking, it should be sufficient to have your trailer serviced at least every six months. There are some specific features that you should check more often according to manufacturers’ recommendations. These include the breakaway functionality, tire pressure, and wheel torque. If you have access to the service manual for your trailer, this should include a maintenance schedule for you to follow. 

What Are Some Specific Maintenance Tasks That Enclosed Utility Trailers Require?

The manufacturer of your trailer may also publish trailer maintenance checklists that you can use as a guide. While it is best to use a maintenance checklist written specifically for your trailer, this is not always necessary. If you can find a list for a trailer that has all the same components as yours, you can still use it.

Examples of maintenance tasks that typically need to be performed on an enclosed utility trailer include the following:

  • Tires: Check your tires for cracks that indicate dry rotting. If you find any, your tires need to be replaced. Your tires also need replacement if the tread has reached the wear bar or is less than 2/32 of an inch deep. You also need to check the air pressure in the tire often, which can fluctuate with changes in the weather.
  • Hitch: An improperly aligned hitch can make steering difficult or cause the trailer to sway from side to side. You should check the hitch frequently for damage, and if you are experiencing problems that may relate to improper alignment, you should have it adjusted.
  • Brakes: Problems with the brakes or the trailer brake controller could cause the trailer to jackknife or skid when stopping. When you grab each brake shoe and try to rock it back and forth, the resistance from the brake drum should be equal and the movement should be smooth without any stuttering or play.
  • Body: Keep the body of the trailer free from corrosion by keeping it clean and using sprays, coatings, sealants, or waxes. Keeping the trailer clean also helps you to identify minor problems early on.

Do You Need To Grease the Wheel Bearings?

Whether you need to grease the wheel bearings depends on what kind of trailer you have. Newer trailers are more likely to have wheel bearings that are lubed for life. However, if your trailer is older, you may still have to grease the wheel bearings. How often you do this depends on the size of your trailer and how often you use it. Grease the bearings every six months when the trailer is not in use or every 2,000 to 12,000 miles when it is.

Do You Need To Perform Trailer Maintenance Yourself?

You do not need to perform the required maintenance on your trailer yourself. If you are unfamiliar with the processes or have an issue that you cannot identify and resolve yourself, you can take it to the service department at McFarlane. Find out more about the trailer maintenance and repair services we offer.